book cover image High-Speed Networking:
A Systematic Approach to High-Bandwidth Low Latency Communication

James P.G. Sterbenz and Joseph D. Touch

with contributions from Julio Escobar, Rajesh Krishnan, and Chunming Qiao
technical editor A. Lyman Chapin
Wiley, 2001
LC: TK5105.5 S743


List of Figures

Chapter 1. Introduction

  1. Canonical system and protocol diagram

Chapter 2. Fundamentals and Design Principles

  1. Ideal high-speed network
  2. Decomposed ideal network Model
  3. End-toend vs. hop-by-hop
  4. Endpoint recursion
  5. Layering based on component type
  6. Layered service abstractions
  7. OSI protocol layers and data units
  8. Hourglass Internet protocol model
  9. TCP/IP over ATM (for example 2.1)
  10. Hierarchical clustering
  11. Hop-by-hop acknowledgments
  12. Incremental parameter negotiation
  13. Open- and closed-loop feedback control
  14. Protocol dependencies
  15. Pipelined processing
  16. Cut-through paths
  17. Copying vs. remapping of data

Chapter 3. Network Architecture and Topology

  1. Network architecture and protocols
  2. Ideal network model
  3. Scaling networks
  4. Delay along network paths
  5. Star backbone topology
  6. Satellite network topology
  7. Bandwidth along network paths
  8. Wavelength routing and assignment
  9. Degree of connectivity
  10. Hierarchical clustering
  11. Hierarchical network engineering
  12. ATM virtual connection hierarchy (for Example 3.2)
  13. Wireless density control
  14. Multiple provider infrastructure
  15. Interworking of heterogeneous subnetworks
  16. Multicast efficiency
  17. Optimisation of bandwidth vs. memory (for Example 3.5)

Chapter 4. Network Control and Signalling

  1. Network architecture and protocols
  2. Ideal network model
  3. Packet flow diagram and parameters
  4. Circuit switching
  5. Message switching
  6. Conventional datagram forwarding
  7. Connection-oriented switching
  8. Data-driven state accumulation
  9. Optimistic connection establishment
  10. TAG burst switching
  11. IBT burst switching
  12. RFD and JET burst switching
  13. Multipoint tree establishment
  14. Session control signalling
  15. Explicit congestion notification
  16. Multipoint dynamics
  17. Node mobility
  18. Mobile IP and cellular telephony telescoping (for Example 4.3)
  19. Active monitoring and control (for Example 4.4)

Chapter 5. Network Components

  1. Network node and link architecture
  2. Ideal network model
  3. Point-to-point dedicated link
  4. ITU transport networks (for Example 5.0)*
  5. GFP formats (for Example 5.0)*
  6. GFP in OTN (for Example 5.0)*
  7. SONET frame formats (for Example 5.1)
  8. Multiplexed Links
  9. OTN Interfaces (for Example 5.A)*
  10. OTN framing and multiplexing (for Example 5.A)*
  11. OTN digital wrapper (for Example 5.A)*
  12. OTN link multiplexing hierarchy (for Example 5.A)*
  13. Shared medium link
  14. Ethernet frame formats (for Example 5.2)
  15. Amplifiers, regenerators, and repeaters
  16. Bent pipe satellite link
  17. SONET dual-ring topology (for Example 5.3)
  18. Hubs, bridges, and switches
  19. Switch functions
  20. Store-and-forward router
  21. Third-party bus forwarding
  22. Ideal switch model
  23. Connection-oriented fast packet switch
  24. Label swapping lookup
  25. Label swapping along a virtual connection
  26. End-to-end vs. hop-by-hop segmentation and reassembly
  27. Packet structure
  28. ATM cell format (for Example 5.4)
  29. MPLS shim format (for Example 5.5)
  30. Leaky bucket
  31. Electronic control of optical burst switch
  32. Burst collision
  33. Unbuffered and internally buffered switches
  34. Input and output buffered switches
  35. Combined input/output buffered switch
  36. Shared buffer switch
  37. Input vs. output queueing
  38. Virtual output queueing
  39. Bus switch
  40. Shared memory switch
  41. Basic switch element states
  42. 2 × 2 switch element
  43. 2 × 2 self-routing switch element
  44. Electro-optical switch element
  45. Crosspoints (electronic and optical MEMS)
  46. Crossbar switch point states
  47. Crossbar switch
  48. Delta switch
  49. Benes switch
  50. Banyan switch
  51. Dilated Benes switch
  52. Parallel switch slices
  53. Crossbar multicast scheduling
  54. MIN multicast with copy stages
  55. Fast datagram switch
  56. Datagram switch with shared forwarding engines
  57. Address lookup
  58. IPv4 and IPv6 packet formats (for example 5.6)
  59. IP prefix matching
  60. Tire prefix matching
  61. Ternary CAM prefix matching
  62. Multistage prefix match
  63. Source routed label stack
  64. Multidimensional packet filtering
  65. Active network node reference model
  66. High-speed active router

Chapter 6. End Systems

  1. End system architecture and protocols
  2. End system hardware
  3. End system software
  4. Layered I/O model communications flow
  5. Ideal end system model
  6. Instruction paths
  7. Threads and processes
  8. Kernel and user space
  9. Virtual address translation
  10. Protocol bypass
  11. Conventional and ILP (integrated layer) processing
  12. Simple bus architecture
  13. Bus architecture with DMA
  14. Separate memory and I/O bus
  15. Crossbar interconnect
  16. Interconnect interface architecture
  17. Memory interface architecture
  18. Fully interfaced hypercube multiprocessor
  19. Software saturation
  20. Interconnect interface architecture
  21. Memory interface architecture
  22. Transmit pipeline
  23. Receive pipeline

Chapter 7. End-to-End Protocols

  1. End-to-end protocols
  2. Ideal end-to-end network model
  3. End-to-end vs. hop-by-hop
  4. End-to-end Internet Protocols (for Example 7.2)
  5. Open- and closed-loop feedback control and nesting
  6. Shortening of connections
  7. Long latency effects of flows
  8. Transfer modes: datagram, transaction, connection, stream
  9. Transport and network layer connections
  10. Connection state machine
  11. Streaming playout point
  12. Transport and application layer state sharing
  13. Packet size
  14. Delay and jitter imposed by long packets
  15. Application layer framing (ALF)
  16. Layered multiplexing
  17. Error control schemes: go-back-{em}n{/em}, selective repeat, and periodic state
  18. Multipoint ACK implosion
  19. Open-loop rate control
  20. Peak and average rate
  21. Closed-loop flow and congestion control
  22. Congestion avoidance and control regions (knee and cliff)
  23. Effect of high bandwidth
  24. Slow-start congestion window initialisation
  25. Additive-increase multiplicative-decrease (AIMD)
  26. Explicit vs. implicit dynamic window: implicit, fast retransmit, explicit
  27. TCP slow start and steady state control (for Example 7.8)
  28. TCP fields affecting high performance (for Example 7.9)
  29. High-speed encryption engine*
  30. AES encryptor (for Example 7.10)*
Chapter 8. Networked Applications
  1. Applications and interface to lower layers
  2. Application utility functions: best effort and interactive
  3. Application utility functions: real-time and deadline
  4. Information access flow
  5. Web browsing bandwidth requirements
  6. Information push flow
  7. Telepresence flow
  8. Distributed computing flow
  9. Mirroring
  10. Local caching [see errata for correct figure]
  11. Network caching hierarchy
  12. Datacycle vs. request/response
  13. Compression latency
  14. Pipelining
  15. Interplanetary Web browsing (for Example 8.1)
  16. Striping and skew tolerance
  17. Knobs and dials

Chapter 9. Future Directions and Conclusions

*new since publication; see additions page


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©2003 James P.G. Sterbenz <jpgs@sterbenz.org>